8 Interview Tips for Active-Duty Service Members Transitioning to Civilian Life

 

In 2016, more than 180,000 active-duty personnel and officers separated from their respective branches of service. For some it was due to an expiration of term of service (ETS) and early release or retirement. For others, it could have been due to disability or other type of separation.

Whatever the reason, transitioning from active duty to civilian life can be a difficult experience. Add the pressure to find a new job, and the transition can become a burdensome challenge. This is especially true when it comes to the interview process.

Topics: Military and Veterans, Career Development

Why Adult Learners Tend To Make Better College Students

 

Am I too old for this?

This is something many adult learners ask themselves. So chances are, you have asked yourself this very question, too. It’s an understandable thought because going back to college as an adult can be intimidating.  

Sure, maybe it has been awhile since you’ve written a paper or taken a test. Or, you are wondering how you will fit your course work in with all your other commitments.

However, as an adult, there are things that make you a far better student today than you would have been 10, 20 or 30 years ago. In fact, you may have more of an advantage as a mature, self-directed adult than you did as a fresh-faced high school graduate. 

So instead of wondering if you’re too old to go back to college, consider that now might be the best time ever for you. Here’s why.

Topics: Student Success

How I Graduated College By Only Taking One Class

(Spoiler: That doesn’t mean I didn’t study like mad.)

In December 2015, I’d had enough.

I’m a writer, but most months my writing doesn’t pay the bills. I live in Southeast Asia and, for years, my day job has been teaching English, phonics and reading. When I first came to this part of the world, a college degree wasn’t necessary to get a decent job – what was important was native English-speaking ability, experience, professionalism and training.

Things changed. While many employers were willing to hire me, they couldn’t, because laws had been put into place making it difficult or impossible to obtain a work permit for a prospective employee who did not have a bachelor’s degree.

Rather than work “under the table” (illegally), I decided I was going to finally – somehow – get my degree.

Topics: Taking Courses, Going Back to College

The Accounting Skills You Are Not Learning In College

This post originally appeared on LinkedIn.

I entered the field of accounting and finance by accident.

I was working as a manager in a fast-food restaurant when the office manager quit and the owner said he would like me to interview for the position. Naturally, I was interested, but I had gone to vocational school for computer programming and never learned the basics of accounting (debits and credits). Later, I realized that when the owner said “office manager,” he really meant “bookkeeper” and “administrator,” however, he did teach me basic accounting skills. I also took introductory financial accounting classes at my local community college, and I became an excellent bookkeeper.

Today, I work for a nonprofit agency in New York as an accounting manager. While I credit that initial opportunity, my accounting course work and my degree for getting me where I am today, there is a skillset that is often overlooked by most college students, yet was critical to my accounting career: a good understanding of computer applications in general.

Topics: Areas of Study and Degree Programs

How to Build a Powerful Online Persona on Social Media

Did you know that according to a 2017 CareerBuilder survey, more than 44 percent of employers reported hiring a job candidate because of the content found on a social networking site?

The survey also found that employers who hired candidates based upon their online persona did so because the candidate demonstrated their professional qualifications (38 percent), great communication skills (37 percent), professional image (36 percent) and creativity (35 percent). However, that doesn’t mean you should hide or delete your social profiles; in fact, CareerBuilder also determined that 57 percent of employers are less likely to contact a candidate for an interview who is MIA online.

Topics: Careers

5 Essential Tips for Translating Military Experience to a Civilian Resume

 
Entering the workforce or changing careers can be one of the toughest hurdles of our lives. Even before we land a position, we must make it through the taxing job search process and develop a resume. Even then, we aren’t guaranteed a job.
 
Military members face even greater challenges when transitioning to civilian life.
 
Most often, with only military experience to rely on, where do you begin to translate codes, acronyms or training associated with terms civilians will understand? How do you condense years of military training into a resume that doesn’t span miles long?

Topics: Military and Veterans

How to Avoid Being Duped by Social Engineering Tricks

We’re only human. But that’s precisely the trait that makes us such an easy mark.

While cybersecurity hardware or software reflexively does what it’s programmed to do, human behavior isn’t nearly as mechanical. This can make us vulnerable to social engineering.

Social engineering is defined as a nontechnical method of intrusion hackers’ use that relies on human interaction. The tactic usually involves tricking individuals into breaking with routine security procedures.

Topics: Cybersecurity

Moodle Gets a Makeover!


If you haven’t heard the latest – Moodle is getting a makeover!

That’s right, Moodle, our Learning Management System (LMS) is getting a facelift of sorts to improve the user experience. Moodle’s fresh, modern look incorporates several enhancements, making it more user friendly and content-focused to allow you to navigate your course space with greater ease.

Topics: Taking Courses

The Biggest Cybersecurity Lesson We Learned from the Equifax Hack

It played out like a cybersecurity horror film.

Between mid-May through July, nearly 143 million Americans had their personal identifiable information (PII) stolen by hackers who breached the consumer credit reporting agency’s cyberdefenses. While the investigation is still underway, preliminary reports blame vulnerabilities in Equifax’s backend software; a popular application called Apache Struts, a well-known and respected product used in more than 60 percent of the world’s Fortune 500 companies.

Whether you have a vested interest in cybersecurity or you’re the average American consumer, Equifax’s epic data breach was more than unsettling; it was downright terrifying on a massive scale. The company trusted to safeguard our sensitive financial data had the security of its data compromised.

Topics: Cybersecurity

10 Simple Tips to Step Up Your Online Safety and Security

Did you know that 594 million people are affected by cybercrime each year?

So it makes sense why hardly a week goes by without hearing of a mega data breach that exposes the personal identifiable information (PII) of countless people to those with malicious intent. These breaches then dominate the headlines and draw the attention – and fears – of users.

What is less known is that more than 95 percent of all breaches have a common denominator: human interaction. Whether intentional or unintentional, most breaches are triggered by people who are either ignorant of cyberhygiene or have made a careless mistake in their online activities.

Topics: Areas of Study and Degree Programs, Cybersecurity